Illegal jukebox business stripped of assets

24/02/2012

The directors of a digital jukebox business were today found to have made over £2.2m from what the judge described as “a wholly illegal business” and have been stripped of their assets, valued at almost £250,000.

Malcolm Wylie and his son, Peter Wylie, who between them were sentenced to over four years in prison for running a number of illegal businesses, were today ordered by Newcastle Crown Court to pay over £131,000 to the BPI/PPL.  The decision follows on from an earlier hearing where the third director, William Ross, was ordered to pay £102,000.

Over the course of seven years, the defendants fraudulently claimed to operate a fully licensed service and to be paying PPL fees but did not make a single payment to PPL.

The systems which were sold under the name of Mixopia were loaded with music and music videos illegally sourced from unauthorised services on the internet and sold to landlords in pubs and clubs throughout the North of England.

Commenting on the outcome of the hearing, BPI Director of Anti Piracy, David Wood, said: “The outcome of today’s hearing is recompense for artists who have been deprived of a fair return for their work.  The illegal activity has not only harmed the music industry but also those landlords who, in difficult economic times, believed they were paying for a legitimate service when in fact they were being exploited.  We would like to thank PPL for their partnership in bringing this case to a successful outcome.”

“This is a great result for both the BPI and PPL,” said Richard Stewart, Head of Dubbing and Tariff Development at PPL.

“We have worked tirelessly over the past four years to secure justice for our members in regards to the case of Wylie, Wylie and Ross.  We look forward to continuing our collaboration with the BPI and we will actively pursue any illegal businesses that deprive our members of their rightful revenues or harm the wider music industry.”

 

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